Research Publication Development and Implementation of Integrated Road Traffic Injuries Surveillance – India (IRIS-India): A Protocol

2020-02-18T22:17:59+05:30December 15th, 2019|
Journal Name ADVANCED JOURNAL OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE
Publication Year 2019
Volume 2020;4(*):e*
Authors Bontha V. Babu, Kamalabai R. John, Ponnaiah Manickam, Jugal Kishore, Rajesh Singh, Daya K. Mangal, Ashish Joshi, Mohan Bairwa, Yogita Sharma

Abstract

Road traffic accidents stand as one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity across the globe. The reasons for the high burden of road traffic injuries (RTIs) in developing countries are increasing in the number of motor vehicles, poor enforcement of traffic safety regulations, inadequacy of health infrastructure and poor transport facility. However, the systematic collection of road traffic data is not well developed in many developing countries including India and under-reporting of RTIs and deaths are common. Hence, surveillance of RTIs is recommended to assess the burden, to identify high-risk groups, to establish an association with probable risk factors and to plan interventions to control the RTIs. The broad objective of this study is to establish an electronic-based comprehensive and integrated RTI surveillance system, to assess the burden of RTIs, its risk factors and outcomes across rural and urban settings in India. This study with the support of the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) is progressing in three cities (Chennai, Delhi and Jaipur) and two rural areas (Chittoor and Tehri-Garhwal). At each centre, major sources of data can be categorized under two categories including health facilities and community. In urban areas, one trauma centre, one private hospital and a community of 10000-population are included in the study. In rural areas, a district hospital, a private nursing home and two sub-centres areas of different primary health centres at each site are included for the surveillance. Passive surveillance is done at the trauma centres/district hospitals, while active surveillance is done in private hospitals/nursing homes, sub-centres and communities. Before establishing the surveillance system, situational analysis has been undertaken. Surveillance-related software was developed during the preparatory stage. This electronic surveillance platform allowed to gather data electronically across multiple sites. This internet-enabled surveillance platform has several modules to capture and analyse the data. The present study provides a model of surveillance including both passive and active surveillance to cover maximum number of RTIs. This study further provides the first comprehensive epidemiology of RTIs. The results of these studies will contribute to the setting of research and investment priorities to tackle the burden of RTIs.

Conclusions

RTIs have been recognized globally as an important public health problem, however, the deaths and injuries are preventable. The situation needs serious efforts through governmental policies, including establishing a surveillance system to capture RTIs occurred at all levels. The present study provides a model of surveillance including both passive and active surveillance to cover maximum number of RTIs. This study further provides the first comprehensive epidemiology of RTIs. The results of these studies will contribute to the setting of research and investment priorities to tackle the burden of RTIs.